Name
Lancashire Lightning

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Established
1864 (154 years old)

Sport
Cricket

Manager
Glen Chapple

Stadium/Home
Old Trafford
(19,000 Capacity)

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Location
Old Trafford, Greater Manchester

Keywords

League
t20 Blast

Last Edit
zag: 21/Feb/17
Site
Home / Cricket / t20 Blast / Lancashire Lightning


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29 Aug 2015 Lancashire Lightning  166 - 153  Northamptonshire Steelbacks Old Trafford
23 Aug 2014 Birmingham Bears  181 - 177  Lancashire Lightning

Description

Lancashire County Cricket Club, one of eighteen first-class county clubs in the domestic cricket structure of England and Wales, represents the historic county of Lancashire. The club's limited overs team is called Lancashire Lightning.

Founded in 1864 as a successor to Manchester Cricket Club, Lancashire have played at Old Trafford since then and has had senior status from inception: i.e., classified by substantial sources as holding important match status from 1865 (first match) to 1894; classified as an official first-class team from 1895 by Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC) and the County Championship clubs; classified as a List A team since the beginning of limited overs cricket in 1963; and classified as a senior Twenty20 team since 2003.

Lancashire was widely recognised as the unofficial Champion County four times between 1879 and 1889. When the County Championship was officially founded in December 1889, Lancashire was one of eight clubs to feature in the competition’s first season in 1890. In 1895, Archie MacLaren scored 424 in an innings for Lancashire, which remains the highest score by an Englishman in first-class cricket. Lancashire won their first two County Championship titles in 1897 and 1904. Between 1926 and 1934, Lancashire won the County Championship five times. In 1950, they shared the title with Surrey. Cyril Washbrook became Lancashire’s first professional captain in 1954. Lancashire next won the County Championship in 2011, after a gap of 77 years.

Johnny Briggs, whose career lasted from 1879 to 1900, was the first player to score 10,000 runs and take 1,000 wickets for Lancashire. Ernest Tyldesley, younger brother of Johnny Tyldesley, is the club’s leading run-scorer with 34,222 runs in 573 matches for Lancashire between 1909 and 1936. Fast bowler Brian Statham took a club record 1,816 wickets in 430 first-class matches between 1950 and 1968.

The Lancashire side of the late 1960s and early 1970s, which was captained by Jack Bond and featured the West Indian batsman Clive Lloyd, was successful in limited overs cricket, winning the Sunday League in 1969 and 1970 and the Gillette Cup four times between 1970 and 1975. Lancashire won the Benson and Hedges Cup in 1984, three times between 1990 and 1996, and the Sunday League in 1989, 1998 and 1999. The County Championship was restructured in 2000 with Lancashire in the first division. Since then they have been relegated three times, and each time were promoted the following season.

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Stadium or Home

Old Trafford, known for sponsorship reasons as Emirates Old Trafford, is a cricket ground in Old Trafford, Greater Manchester, England. It opened in 1857 as the home of Manchester Cricket Club and has been the home of Lancashire County Cricket Club since 1864.

Old Trafford is England's second oldest test venue and one of the most renowned. It was the venue for the first ever Ashes test to be held in England in July 1884 and has hosted two Cricket World Cup semi-finals. In 1956, the first 10-wicket haul in a single innings was achieved by England bowler Jim Laker who achieved bowling figures of 19 wickets for 90 runs - a bowling record which is unmatched in test and first-class cricket. In the 1993 Ashes Test at Old Trafford, leg-spinner Shane Warne bowled Mike Gatting with the Ball of the Century.

Extensive redevelopment of the ground to increase capacity and modernise facilities began in 2009 in an effort to safeguard international cricket at the venue. The pitch at Old Trafford has historically been the quickest in England, but will take spin later in the game.

The site was first used as a cricket ground in 1857, when the Manchester Cricket Club moved onto the meadows of the de Trafford estate. Despite the construction of a large pavilion (for the amateurs – the professionals used a shed at the opposite end of the ground), Old Trafford's first years were rocky: accessible only along a footpath from the railway station, the ground was situated out in the country, and games only attracted small crowds. It was not until the Roses match of 1875 that significant numbers attended a game. When W. G. Grace brought Gloucestershire in 1878, Old Trafford saw 28,000 spectators over three days, and this provoked improvements to access and facilities.

In 1884, Old Trafford became the second English ground, after The Oval, to stage Test cricket: with the first day being lost to rain, England drew with Australia. Expansion of the ground followed over the next decade, with the decision being taken to construct a new pavilion in 1894.

The ground was purchased outright from the de Traffords in 1898, for £24,372, as crowds increased, with over 50,000 spectators attending the 1899 Test match.

In 1902, the Australian Victor Trumper hit a hundred before lunch on the first day; Australia went on to win the Test by 3 runs – the third closest Test result in history.

Crowds fell through the early 20th Century, and the ground was closed during the First World War; however, in the conflict's aftermath, crowd numbers reached new heights. Investment followed throughout the inter-war period, and during this time, Lancashire experienced their most successful run to date, gaining four Championship titles in five years.

During the Second World War, Old Trafford was used as a transit camp for troops returning from Dunkirk, and as a supply depot. In December 1940, the ground was hit by bombs, damaging or destroying several stands. Despite this damage – and the failure of an appeal to raise funds for repairs – cricket resumed promptly after the war, with German PoWs being paid a small wage to prepare the ground. The 'Victory Test' between England and Australia of August 1945 proved to be extremely popular, with 76,463 seeing it over three days.

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