Name
Eugenie Bouchard

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User Rating
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Born
1994 (24 years old)

Birth Place
Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Position
Tennis Player

Height/Weight
1.78 m (5 ft 10 in) /

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Sport
Tennis

Team
ATP Womens

League
ATP World Tour



Site
Home / Tennis / ATP World Tour / ATP Womens / Eugenie Bouchard

Description

Eugenie "Genie" Bouchard (/buːˈʃɑːrd/; French: Eugénie Bouchard, pronounced ); born February 25, 1994) is a Canadian-born professional tennis player residing in the Bahamas. At the 2014 Wimbledon Championships, she became the first Canadian-born player representing Canada to reach the final of a Grand Slam tournament in singles, finishing runner-up to Petra Kvitová; she also reached the semifinals of the 2014 Australian Open and 2014 French Open. Having won the 2012 Wimbledon girls' title, she was named WTA Newcomer of the Year at the end of the 2013 WTA Tour. Finally, Bouchard received the WTA Most Improved Player award for the 2014 season and reached a career-high ranking of No. 5, becoming the first Canadian female tennis player to be ranked in the top 5 in singles.

Due to her struggles with form, her ranking in January 2018 dropped out of the top 100 for the first time since April 2013.

Early life and junior career
Eugenie Bouchard was born as one of a pair of twins to Michel Bouchard, an investment banker, and Julie Leclair in Montreal.

Bouchard started playing tennis at the age of five and was a member of Tennis Canada's National Training Centre in Montreal. She attended The Study school in Westmount. At age 12, she moved to Florida with her mother to be coached by Nick Saviano, where she met one of her best childhood friends, tennis player Laura Robson. From that time on, she was nicknamed "the chosen one" by her siblings. Her father established a limited partnership called "Tennis Mania" to support Eugenie's career. He and two investors contributed money to the partnership in exchange for 10 percent of Bouchard's future earnings when she would become a professional tennis player. In August 2013, a court ruled that the partnership has no legal claims as Eugenie, then a 9-year-old, could not have reasonably agreed to giving away parts of her future earnings. Her father had argued that the money he had put into the partnership before Eugenie turned pro was a business loss which would have meant a tax benefit for himself.

At 15, Bouchard returned to Montreal for training.


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